Honorable Mention – 2016 Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award |

Lynsey Addario is an American photojournalist based in London.

“For the past fifteen years, Lynsey has been on the front lines of almost every major conflict of her generation. She has been kidnapped twice while on assignment for The New York Times and has been beaten, groped, and threatened with execution. She has done remarkable credit to her profession through her skill and bravery, and her focused and unwavering dedication to telling the most vital stories of her day. She has covered most major conflicts of her generation with empathy and deep compassion for the most defenseless, who exist in the grip of war.”

Addario regularly works for The New York Times, National Geographic, and Time Magazine. She began photographing professionally for the Buenos Aires Herald
in 1996 with no previous photographic training. In the late 1990s, she began freelancing in New York City for the Associated Press, where she worked consistently for three years before moving to New Delhi, India, to cover South Asia for the Boston Globe and Houston Chronicle. In 2000, Addario first traveled to Afghanistan to document life and oppression of women living under the Taliban, and made three separate trips to the country under Taliban rule before September 11, 2001. In the past 15 years, Addario has covered every major conflict and humanitarian crises of her generation, including Afghanistan, Iraq, Darfur, Libya, Syria, Lebanon, South
Sudan, and Congo. 

In 2009, she was awarded a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship, and was part of the New York Times team to win the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting, for her photographs in ‘Talibanistan,’ published in the The New York Times Magazine. She was the recipient of the Overseas Press Club’s Oliver Rebbot award for ‘Best Photographic Reporting from Abroad in Magazines and Books,’ for her series ‘Veiled Rebellion,’ an intimate look at the lives of Afghan Women. In 2010 she was named one of 20 women on Oprah Winfrey’s Power List, for her ‘Power of Bearing Witness,’ and one of Glamour Magazine’s 20 Women of the Year in 2011. In 2015, American Photo Magazine named Addario one of the five most influential photographers of the past 25 years. She recently released a New York Times Best selling memoir, “It’s What I Do,” which chronicles her personal and professional life as a photojournalist coming of age in the post-9/11 world. It is her first book.

Addario has spent the last four years documenting the plight of Syrian refugees and internally displaced in Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey, and Iraq for The New York Times. Her recent bodies of work include “The Displaced” for the New York Times Magazine, a portfolio of the lives of three children displaced from war in Syria,
Ukraine, and South Sudan.

“It is a great honor for me to be recognized in the spirit and talent of Anja Niedringhaus. She was one of the most talented, passionate, sensitive and dedicated photojournalists I have met over the years. Our work takes us to some of the world’s darkest places, and our role is to document the reality on the ground, and to get it out to the greater public. We are messengers who have the privilege of witnessing the world around us in order to educate policy makers and the public, to create a document of history, to undo prejudices, and to create awareness. I am so honored to have been nominated and selected as a finalist for the Anja Niedringhaus Award.”

  Lynsey Addario

Kursat Bayhan

Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario

Addario in Gaza

Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario

Addario in Turkey

 

Lynsey Addario’s Photos

Warning: Images contain violent content

  (c) Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario/Getty Images Reportage

Zaatari refugee camp, Jordan – August 29, 2014: Rahaf Yousef, 13, a Syrian refugee from Daraa, poses for a portrait in her family’s trailer as she is surrounded by female relatives on the day of her engagement party at the Zaatari refugee camp. Rahaf will get married to another Syrian refugee, Mohammed, 18, in about 20 days. While marriage under the age of eighteen was a common Syrian tradition before the start of the civil war, more and more Syrian girls are marrying at a younger age because of the insecurity of the war, because many families feel the girls in their family may be sexually harassed if they are not under the care of a husband, and because of prospect of alleviating the financial burden of one more mouth to feed.

 
  (c) Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario/Getty Images Reportage

Tolosa, Philippines – January 11, 2014: Midwife Norena Malate delivers the baby of Analyn Pleado, 18, as Analyn’s husband, Ryan Bacate, 21, looks on on the side of the road en route to the rural health unit in Tolosa, outside of Tacloban, in the Philippines. During Typhoon Haiyan, the couple’s house was destroyed, and they were displaced to a more remote village of Tabon. Analyn feared after the typhoon that she wouldn’t find a place to deliver. ‘All the clinics and Barangay health stations were destroyed.’ She had gone into labor the evening before, but because it was raining, and dark, she waited until the morning to travel by motorcycle with her husband to the nearest clinic with a midwife in Tolosa. A stranger passing by witnessed Analyn in labor on the side of the road, and went to bring the midwife. Typhoon Hayien hit the Philippines on November 8, 2013, and killed some six thousand people, and affected some 14.1 million others, destroying their homes, livelihoods, and displacing families. There are currently over 250,000 pregnant women in the affected area, with much of the medical infrastructure
destroyed.

 
  (c) Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario/Getty Images Reportage

Sea between Italy and Libya – October 4, 2014: Italian sailors rescue 109 African migrants from Gambia, Mali, Senegal, Ivory Coast, Guinea, and Nigeria, from a rubber boat in the sea between Italy and Libya. The migrants claimed to have left from Tripoli the evening of October 3rd, and spent the night moving north. The Italian Navy has several navy ships patrolling international and Italian waters at any given time in an attempt to rescue migrants, and transfer them safely to shore in Italy. Since the beginning of 2014, roughly 120,000 refugees have landed in Italy, more than double the total for the entire year of 2013.

 
  (c) Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario/Getty Images Reportage

Kabul, Afghanistan – May 31, 2014: Afghan women sit in a temporary holding area after being turned over to Women for Afghan Women, or while waiting for a mediation session between themselves and their families at a WAW office in Kabul. According to women’s groups, shelters have been one of the great achievements of Afghanistan over the past twelve years. They have saved several thousands of women’s lives by offering them a safe place while family disputes are worked out, though they continue to be regarded with suspicion by most Afghans. As foreigners reduce their presence in Afghanistan, shelters are on uncertain footing, because they are funded entirely by donors, they could easily close when donor interest flags.

 
  (c) Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario/Getty Images Reportage

Bentiu, South Sudan – May 4, 2014: A dead government soldier with the Sudanese People’s Liberation Army lies in the road in front of the base of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan as civilians pass by with water and food they collected from town during a lull in fighting between government and opposition forces. Bentiu has changed hands between government and opposition control several times since the civil war began in December, and has been the scene of ethnic massacres where hundreds, if not thousands, have been killed in the past months, pushing over 20,000 into a camp for displaced inside the UNMISS camp outside the town. One million Southern Sudanese have been displaced from their homes as the civil war rages in the country, pitting ethnic Nu’er against Dinka.

 
  (c) Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario/Getty Images Reportage

Kabul, Afghanistan – May 28, 2014: Gul Meena, 16, poses for a portrait in a shelter run by Women for Afghan Women in Kabul after being left for dead by her family in Nangahar province: her brother slashed her over a dozen times with an ax after Gul Meena fled an older husband who had beaten her and ran away with another man. According to women’s groups, shelters have been one of the great achievements of Afghanistan over the past twelve years. They have saved several thousands of women’s lives by offering them a safe place while family disputes are worked out, though they continue to be regarded with suspicion by most Afghans. As foreigners reduce their presence in Afghanistan, shelters are on uncertain footing, because they are funded entirely by donors, they could easily close when donor interest flags.

 
  (c) Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario/Getty Images Reportage

Bentiu, South Sudan – May 4, 2014: Nyanen Yak lies ill with severe pneumonia in a clinic run by Doctors Without Borders at the base of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan, where over 20,000 internally displaced people are currently seeking shelter. Since the civil war began in December 2013, the town of Bentiu has changed hands between government and opposition troops several times, leaving hundreds, if not thousands, dead and injured in a series of ethnic killings pitting ethnic Nu’er against Dinka. Across South Sudan, roughly one million Southern Sudanese have been displaced from their homes and are facing risk of disease and starvation, and aid agencies and the United Nations are scrambling to provide for civilians with limited resources and emergency conditions as fighting continues.

 
  (c) Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario/Getty Images Reportage

Nikishino village, Ukraine – September 27, 2015: Oleg Teryokhin sits at a desk in one of the classrooms in his former school in Nikishino village, which was destroyed by the east Ukraine war. Nikishino village was far from the sites of early skirmishing and neither side bothered trying to control this small village until it turned out it was on the path of a major Ukrainian offensive begun in July with the goal of encircling Donetsk city, the provincial capital. Using long-range artillery and spotter aircraft to target it, the Ukrainian army was pushing separatists back from one town after another. Galina Teryokhina, Oleg’s mother, said residents didn’t take the war seriously until mid July, 2014. Oleg was playing outside in the
afternoon when loud explosions were heard in the sky. Later, some papers with English writing and bits of charred clothes fluttered through the village, and Oleg picked some up. Nikishino village was at the edge of the debris field of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, likely shot down by rebels who mistook it for a Ukrainian spotter aircraft.

 
  (c) Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario/Getty Images Reportage

Camp Bajid Kadal, Iraq – August 17, 2014: An Iraqi Yazidi family from the al Jazeera village in Sinjar arrives at the Bajid Kandal camp after spending four days at the Nowruz camp in Syria before crossing back into Northern Iraq. Since fighters with the Islamic State started pushing through Iraq and murdering and terrorizing thousands of civilians, hundreds of thousands have been displaced from their homes across the country. The United Nations is beginning its largest humanitarian aid distribution in a decade.

 
  (c) Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario/Getty Images Reportage

Uganda – December 8, 2015: Ayak, from Malakal, in South Sudan, poses for a portrait in a safe house. Ayak grew up in Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya, and returned back to South Sudan with her family after independence. Shortly after returning, fighting resumed, and Ayak and her family fled from Malakal to Bentiu. Her mother was killed, her father died of a suspected heart attack along the way; Ayak was raped en route to Bentiu. She eventually made it to the UNMISS camp in Bentiu, where she lived for over one year, She was raped by armed men while living within the UNMISS camp. Ayak is now 9 months pregnant from the rape, and expecting her child any day. As the world takes more notice of rape being used as a weapon of war, Congo’s dark history of sexual violence in conflict has much to teach the world on how to prevent rape, and how it can help survivors heal physically, emotionally, and socially.

 
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