Heather Gies

Freelance Journalist @hmgies @HeatherGies

Heather Gies is a freelance journalist who writes about politics and social issues in Latin America, particularly human rights, inequality, and resource conflicts in Central America. Her writing has appeared in Al Jazeera, In These Times, Mongabay, NACLA, the Progressive, Ricochet, World Politics Review, and other outlets. Gies previously worked as an editor and writer at teleSUR English in Quito, Ecuador. While completing a Master of Arts in Communication at Simon Fraser University, Gies conducted thesis research on food sovereignty and campesino movements in Honduras. She has continued to cover Honduras’ human rights and political situation, including the recent elections crisis. Gies has a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies from Wilfrid Laurier University. She grew up on a family farm in Southern Ontario, Canada, where she developed, among other interests, a profound love of food.

En Español

Heather Gies es una periodista independiente que escribe sobre política y asuntos sociales en América Latina, en particular los derechos humanos, la desigualdad y los conflictos de recursos en América Central. Su trabajo ha aparecido en Al Jazeera, In These Times, Mongabay, NACLA, The Progressive, Ricochet, World Politics Review y otros medios. Gies trabajó anteriormente como editor y escritora en teleSUR inglés en Quito, Ecuador. Mientras completaba una Maestría en Artes en Comunicación en la Universidad Simon Fraser, Gies realizó investigación de tesis sobre soberanía alimentaria y movimientos campesinos en Honduras. Ella ha continuado cubriendo los derechos humanos de Honduras y la situación política, incluyendo la reciente crisis electoral. Gies tiene un Bachelor of Arts en Estudios de comunicación de la Universidad Wilfrid Laurier. Ella creció en una granja familiar en Sur de Ontario, Canadá, donde desarrolló, entre otros intereses, un profundo amor por comida.

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Reporting

| Julia Gavarrete, Heather Gies

Honduran Teen Fled Gangs at Home only to be Murdered while Stranded at the U.S.-Mexico Border

Amalia Díaz holds an old photo of her deceased grandson, Jorge Alexander Ruiz. Photo: Héctor Edú for The Intercept SIXTEEN-YEAR-OLD JORGE ALEXANDER RUIZ took off alone in the middle of the night from San Pedro Sula,…

| Heather Gies

The kids aren’t alright — when being young is a crime in El Salvador

Daniel Alemán, 23, walked free after spending over a year behind bars on trumped-up extortion charges in El Salvador. Others are not so lucky. Credit: Victor Peña/The World When Daniel Alemán walked free after spending…

| Jane Hahn, Heather Gies

Once lush, El Salvador is dangerously close to running dry

The country’s shrinking water supply is in jeopardy as weak regulation, lagging services, and climate variability fuel a complex crisis. BY HEATHER GIES PHOTOGRAPHS BY JANE HAHN SAN SALVADOR – As the sun comes up through a thick…

| Heather Gies

El Salvador’s disappearing farmers

Salvadoran youth are abandoning the countryside, leaving behind an increasingly aging population of farmers. Cecilia Lopez, 18, carries a bag of fertilizer to her family’s plot of corn in the village of El Milagro [Heather…

| Heather Gies

Battle for Water Rights Heats Up in El Salvador

Activists demonstrate against water privatization outside the Legislative Assembly after marching from the University of El Salvador, San Salvador, July 5, 2018. Sandra Valladares scrapes together a living, washing windshields in the streets of El…

| Kimberly dela Cruz, Heather Gies

El Salvador’s hidden tragedy: ‘I can’t take the agony any more’

The 45-year-old mother of two has been forced to relocated five times due to gang violence [Kimberly dela Cruz/Al Jazeera] San Salvador – Ana Martinez* sometimes cries of happiness and torment at the same time, relieved…

| Heather Gies

‘Our country is not a safe place’: why Salvadorans will still head for the US

Poverty and gang violence are driving an exodus, regardless of US asylum reforms Outside the migrants’ attention centre in San Salvador, 19-year-old Berenice Cruz’s eyes dart around nervously before she whispers that she had fled El…